Updated Reader from Square

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SquareFor those Units who use the Square reader to process credit/debit card payments for your popcorn sales, please make sure you have the most up to date readers on hand.

The newer model is thinner and wider than the older version.

The main reason for the change is to comply with new security features on new credit/debit cards.  You may have received a new card in the mail from your bank or credit card company which has a SIM card.  This new device provides an additional layer of security for your card.

If you have one of the old readers, do not fret.  Square will provide you a new reader at no additional cost. Just click the link below for more information and to get your new reader.

New Square Reader

In addition, Square now offers a device to accept Apple Pay payments.  They are giving away 250,000 of these devices.  Check it out.

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Tax Deductions for Popcorn and other Scouting related items – 2015

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cutting_taxes_8732As we come to the time of year when most people do their taxes, it is important all Scout leaders understand all of the tax deductions available for popcorn sales and other Scouting related functions. Because every family is different when it comes to taxes, please consult your tax advisor before taking these deductions on your taxes.

The vast majority of Scouting expenses can be deducted under Charitable Contributions on Schedule A, Form 1040. For those who do not know Schedule A on Form 1040 is the place for itemized deductions. As always it is important to keep accurate records of all your Scouting activities in order to take these deductions.

The deductible expenses are those in the performance of a Scout leadership position. However, the leadership position does not have to be formal in nature. Being the Popcorn Kernel is an example of this type of position. Another example is if the Scoutmaster and Scouts are going on an overnight camping trip and you are the ‘second adult’ to fulfill Youth Protection Guidelines. In this instance you are in a Scout leadership role and potential tax deductions apply. I still recommend registering at minimum as a committee member of your Unit and take the required Youth Protection Training so as to avoid any confusion.

Remember, if you are reimbursed by your Unit for any of these items below related to a Scouting activity, you can no longer claim the deduction.

Below are the most common deduction which can be applied under ‘Charitable Contributions’:

Mileage

For 2014 and 2015, the mileage rate is 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations. The question is what is ‘driven in service’ mean? This is any mileage driven under the position of a Scout leader. For example, if you are driving your son to a Scout meeting to drop them off, the mileage would not count. However, if you are the Popcorn Kernel and are making a presentation, picking up order forms, or collecting money, the mileage would be deductible. Examples of trips include, but are not limited to, driving to training for popcorn sales, Show and Sell locations, popcorn pick up, popcorn return, Unit meetings, campouts, camp, service projects and Roundtable. Understand, mileage to deliver take order popcorn for your son would not be deductible.

In addition, you may deduct parking fees and tolls to and from Scouting events in addition to the mileage rate.

Uniforms

The Scout Leader’s costs for uniforms, patches, hats, insignia, neckerchiefs, name tags, and other uniform parts are fully deducible provided that they are not of general utility or wear. The cost of upkeep like washing or dry cleaning is also deductible. Your son’s uniform is not deductible.

Supplies

The cost of materials used in Scout activities (popcorn signs, wood, rope, leather, fuel, water filter elements, first aid supplies, etc.) is deductible, as is the transportation needed to purchase such items.

Instruction

Scout leaders can deduct the cost of training courses. Examples of instruction courses include Cub Scout Leader Training, Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation (BALOO), Boy Scout Basic Training, Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills, and Wood Badge. Supplies for these courses like books, maps, and online access fees are also deductible. Courses which go beyond those provided by the Boy Scouts can also be deducted provided they increase your qualifications as a Scout leaders. Examples include CPR classes, Advanced First Aid, Lifesaving, kayaking training, rock climbing training, etc. These expenses are in addition to the mileage to and from training courses as mentioned earlier.

Meals

Reasonable costs for your meals are deductible if in connection with a Scout trip away from home. This includes the cost of food for campouts. For meals to be deductible, the trip must include an overnight stay away from home. Please note, unlike expenses for business meals, the cost for meals at Scouting events away from home are 100% deductible for leaders.

Event Fees

Leaders fees for summer camp, camporee, Jamboree, Order of the Arrow functions including NOAC or Conclave, Philmont, Scout conferences, basic leadership training, etc. are deductible.

Donation of Property and Cash

These two items can be difficult to understand. The main reason is most people do not realize to whom they are donating. Understand the Chartered Organization owns the Unit. Any donation to the Unit is actually a donation to the Chartered Organization. In addition, the donation must be for the benefit of the Unit as a whole and not to a specific individual in the Unit in order for it to qualify. If the value in question is over $250, there are specific reporting requirement that must be met. I order for you to take the deduction for Cash or Property, you must receive this documentation from the organization in which you are donating. For further information review IRS Publication 526.

Popcorn

The IRS defines it in this manner, “If you receive a benefit as a result of making a contribution to a qualified organization, you can deduct only the amount of your contribution that is more than the value of the benefit you receive” (IRS Publication 526). If you purchased popcorn from a Scout last year, you can deduct the amount above and beyond the actual value of the popcorn. For example, on a $10 purchased item you can deduct the “Return to Scouting” of 70% (or $7) on your taxes. Remember this $7 goes to the Council and/or Unit.

I hope this helps you in preparing your taxes this year. Once again, review this information with a qualified tax advisor before taking any tax deduction.

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